Reaction to Unfairness

Monday, 27 February 2012 09:30 Written by
Reaction to Unfairness

How does one deal with unfair behaviors? Today, there is unique neurobiological evidence to account for individual differences of reaction to unfairness. This subject has long been investigated by various disciplines including philosophy, psychology, economics, and biology. However, our reactions to unfairness differ from one individual to another.

Experimental economics studies using the ultimatum game (UG), in which players must decide whether to accept or reject fair or unfair offers, have also shown that there are substantial individual differences in reaction to unfairness. We combined a molecular imaging technique, an economics game, and a personality inventory to elucidate the neurobiological mechanism of heterogeneous reactions to unfairness.

The Anti-Norquist Pledge

Tuesday, 24 January 2012 11:57 Written by
The Anti-Norquist Pledge

The Norquist Pledge has nothing to do with tax reform as understood by most American taxpayers. For example, the majority of Americans favor increasing -- rather than capping -- the marginal tax rates of the top 1%. (By the way, Americans for Tax Reform (ATR) -- a tax-exempt institution -- pays no taxes on its annual revenues of about $5 million per year, according to ATR tax forms.)

Grover Norquist even emphasizes that the pledge has no exceptions for war, natural disaster, or other misfortunes. For example, a signer of the Norquist Pledge isn't permitted to vote to increase tax rates on America's 1% -- even if such changes would be revenue neutral, and/or are desperately needed for a national emergency. Mr. Norquist's real goal (explained in his other writings) is to substantially shrink the size of government.

Reduce Risk Factors in Children

Friday, 09 December 2011 01:10 Written by
Reduce Risk Factors in Children

Disruptive and aggressive behavior in classrooms as early as the first grade has repeatedly been identified as a risk factor for this spectrum of problems later in life (Kellam et al., 2008).

The Good Behavior Game (GBG), a universal (classroom) behavior management method, was tested in first- and second-grade classrooms in Baltimore beginning in the 1985–1986 school year. Followup at ages 19–21 found significantly lower rates of drug and alcohol use disorders, regular smoking, antisocial personality disorder, delinquency and incarceration for violent crimes, suicide ideation, and use of school-based services among students who had played the GBG.

Addiction Research and Clinical Practice

Thursday, 01 December 2011 08:27 Written by
Addiction Research and Clinical Practice

Substance abusers seek help quitting drugs not as an end in itself, but as a means to escape these negative consequences and to gain a better life. Accordingly, while substance abuse treatment seeks to promote abstinence or at least significant reductions in substance use, its ultimate aim is to improve the patient’s quality of life (QOL).  Unfortunately,

Clinicians tend to focus on symptoms, whereas for clients, symptom management is a means to an end.

Alexandre B. Laudet, Ph.D., presents current concepts of QOL and tools used to measure it, summarize recent paradigmatic shifts in the SUD field that are leading to an emerging interest in QOL, and review the evidence bearing on QOL in the treatment of addiction.  Dr. Laudet also presents implications of incorporating QOL concepts into clinical practice and research.

Company Culture is Linked to Bottom Line

Saturday, 04 June 2011 07:18 Written by
Company Culture is Linked to Bottom Line

Recognize This! – You can’t engage employees. You can only create a culture in which they want to engage.

An article in Knoweldeg at W.P. Carey pointed out the importance of company culture to achieving the company strategy – and the peril of ignoring that importance.

Why is culture so important? Culture is simply the shared beliefs, values and behaviors of a group of people.

Change Begins with Desired Results

Saturday, 04 June 2011 07:01 Written by
Change Begins with Desired Results

Your culture produces your results. If you need a change in results, then you need a change in culture. Your culture is always working, either for you or against you. To accelerate a change in the culture, start by defining the new results you wish to achieve. Everyone in the organization needs to be focused on and aligned with the desired new outcomes. Culture changes one person at a time.

Your people must believe that these new results are obtainable. Only then can they change their thinking and actions — something that usually happens when they can verbalize their job descriptions in terms of how they contribute to successful outcomes.

Badly Configured Networks Result in Network Breaches

Wednesday, 01 September 2010 14:08 Written by
Badly Configured Networks Result in Network Breaches

Misconfigured networks account for more than three quarters of breaches. A survey found that a badly configured network is the main cause of network breaches because IT professionals "don’t know what to look for."

The survey, conducted by Tufin, also revealed that 18 percent of security experts believe misconfigured networks are the result of insufficient time or money for audits, while 14 percent felt that compliance audits that do not always capture security best practices are a factor. The CTO and co-founder of Tufin said: "The really big question coming out of the survey is how to manage the risk that organizations run dealing with the complexity that is part and parcel of any medium-to-large sized company’s security operations.

5 Ways to Improve IT Effectiveness

Tuesday, 30 March 2010 15:44 Written by
5 Ways to Improve IT Effectiveness

Is the information-technology function at your company focusing on the same priorities as the business? Based on a recent survey by The Corporate Executive Board's IT Leadership Exchange, the overwhelming answer to this question is—No.

Through a survey of 150 IT departments at mid-sized companies, the IT Leadership Exchange found that 90 percent of CIOs expect that the IT department will be misaligned with business needs in an economic recovery, and more than half feel that this will threaten the business's long-term competitiveness.

China Implicated in Email Attacks

Tuesday, 30 March 2010 14:11 Written by
China Implicated in Email Attacks

China is the number-one source of email-borne targeted attacks of the sort Google and at least 30 other companies are believed to have suffered, according to the latest monthly MessageLabs Intelligence report from Symantec Hosted Services. The firm analyzed the email headers of suspect messages intercepted last month to identify the true IP address of the senders, and found that around 28 percent of targeted attacks originated in China.

CEOs Fail To Support Data Security Efforts

Friday, 20 November 2009 02:51 Written by
CEOs Fail To Support Data Security Efforts

[ed: IT is carrying the water and splitting the firewood, while business considers the lack of investment -- "risk management" -- it's all about money, politics, and time value. There is no real accountability at the top.]

More than half of IT and security professionals worldwide believe their company’s laptops and other mobile devices pose security risks to their organizations, and only half of them have CEOs who are strong advocates and supporters of data security efforts, according to new report issued today.

California To Launch InfoSec Ops Center

Tuesday, 17 November 2009 13:36 Written by
California To Launch InfoSec Ops Center

California intends to create a state-of-the-art information security operations center to monitor cyber-threats and protect state and local government networks from attack. The center also would support local government networks that need assistance.

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