Missing Plutonium?

Friday, 27 March 2009 18:01 Written by
Missing Plutonium?

An Energy Department investigation has alleviated fears that a significant amount of plutonium was missing from a national laboratory, but it has also heightened concerns about flaws in the system for controlling the U.S. stockpile of weapons materials. The investigation began in February, shortly after a routine inventory at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico found a plutonium shortage estimated at 2.2 pounds, setting off a frantic national effort to determine what happened to the material.

The World’s Malware Factory

Thursday, 26 March 2009 00:00 Written by
The World’s Malware Factory

With China’s economy cooling down, some of the country’s IT professionals are turning to cybercrime, according to a Beijing-based security expert. Speaking at the CanSecWest security conference last week, the CEO of Knownsec, a Beijing security company, said that while many Chinese workers may be feeling hard times, business is still booming in the country’s cybercrime industry.

Phishing Gets Automated

Monday, 23 March 2009 00:00 Written by
Phishing Gets Automated

Phishing expeditions business and personal data are rising to record levels, with fake anti-malware campaigns alone increasing by 225 percent in the last six months of 2008. Password-stealing Web sites jumped 827 percent IN 2008. The reason is the phishers are investing in automation. A new report from the Anti-Pjhshing Working Group (APWG) gives a sense of just how aggressive the phishers and malware makers are becoming in search of one’s business (and personal) data.

FCC Terrorism

Sunday, 28 October 2007 12:32 Written by
FCC Terrorism

Dear Senator Cornyn and Senator Hutchison,

Free speech is the most basic element of democracy. Diversity of opinion is the crucible by which ideas are measured. A free press is one protected even when the speech is not agreeable. In the absence of diversity, bad ideas are never challenged. There is no democracy without free speech. 

I am horrified by the repeated attempts of the FCC to lift media ownership limits. It is happening again! The FCC has become an enemy of the people. Our own trustees have betrayed us. Consolidation of media resources dilutes opinion and shouts down diversity.

SRJ 29 - A hard look at a bad bill!

Monday, 01 October 2007 19:11 Written by
SRJ 29 - A hard look at a bad bill!

Proposition 9, S.R.J 29 is a bad bill and I'll tell you why. Below is the relevant section containing the proposed changes to the Texas State Constitution. I have copied it here; however, you are free to go to the source. Texas State Legislature 80R Bill Text S.R.J 29 or you can skip right to read more for the analysis.

Immigration Invasion

Monday, 01 October 2007 04:47 Written by

Even though I'm a fairly well-entrenched, left-wing liberal, I am so angry at current trends regarding immigration. As a professional strategist, I recognize the purpose that the immigration debate serves. Immigration is a wedge issue.  The issue is very polarizing within both conservative and liberal camps. It is not accidental that this issue is receiving so much attention. It is deliberate and purposeful.

Those that advance a position on the foundation of illegal immigration are advancing a cause that undermines national security and sovereignty.  I do not stand blindly with those that advance tollerant (flexible) immigration positions that are, on net, negative to the maturity of our society, culture, safety, security, and economic.

In the interest of American sovereignty and in the interests of our nation, I joyfully break from the left and abandon most social liberals that can not see the danger in this issue.

Special Needs Education

Wednesday, 14 September 2005 00:00 Written by
Special Needs Education

At a time when raising any child is challenging, educating a special needs child is particularly difficult. The federal government has passed laws governing education without thoughtfully funding the measures. As a consequence local school districts are breaking their backs and banks trying to satisfy these federal mandates.

Why is our federal government not fully funding their mandates?

Hard Science and Philosophy

Monday, 12 July 2004 15:58 Written by
Hard Science and Philosophy

Is it even possible for scientists and mathematicians to understand or appreciate philosophy? Do they lack a neccessary nimbleness to discern philosophical questions or the impact of such answers? For many (most) among the "harder" sciences, philosophy shares a stage with religion, art, or fantastic child-like whimsy. Why is this? Could it be they are too judgmental or inflexible in their beliefs? Might they be too acquisitive to be distracted by the philosophical implications of their work? Are they not clever enough to understand it? Perhaps they are too shallow to even grasp fundamental questions?

Mike Alder (a mathematician) explains why practicioners of hard science don’t like philosophy but discretely pursue it anyway. He offers explination to explain why scientists and mathematicians are inclined to be dismissive of the subject. Additionally, Mr. Alder explains how and why they still explore philosophy pseudonymously.

The scientist’s perception of philosophy is that a philosophical analysis is a sterile word game played in a state of mental muddle. When you ask of a scientist if we have free will, or only think we have, he would ask in turn: “What measurements or observations would, in your view, settle the matter?” If your reply is “Thinking deeply about it”, he will smile pityingly and pass you by. He would be unwilling to join you in playing what he sees as a rather silly game.

Do Words Move You?

Wednesday, 07 July 2004 12:00 Written by
Do Words Move You?

Have we forgotten how to experience the excitement that first-class literature was meant to instill? I stumbled upon this article. It's not earth shaking. The principle isn't revolutionary. The people are completely unknown to me. But it asks a question.

Can the lovesick violence of Wuthering Heights or the raw adventure of Moby Dick really make the heart beat faster?

It's a question that comparative literature student Paul Sopcak is exploring, using an intriguing mix of hard science and the arts. Who is Paul Sopcak? Does it matter? The German PhD student, studying at the University of Alberta, is researching the connection between literature and emotions in personal and moral development.

Value in Treating Depression

Wednesday, 07 July 2004 11:54 Written by

NIH LogoWorkplace Depression Screening, Outreach and Enhanced Treatment Improves Productivity, Lowers Employer Costs

Enhanced and systematic efforts to identify and treat depression in the workplace significantly improves employee health and productivity, likely leading to lower costs overall for the employer, according to a study published September 26, 2007, in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).

Left and Right Wing Brains

Monday, 12 April 2004 11:54 Written by
Left and Right Wing Brains

Researchers show that even in humdrum nonpolitical decisions, liberals and conservatives literally think differently. Exploring the neurobiology of politics, scientists have found that liberals tolerate ambiguity and conflict better than conservatives because of how their brains work.

In a simple experiment reported today in the journal Nature Neuroscience, scientists at New York University and UCLA show that political orientation is related to differences in how the brain processes information. Previous psychological studies have found that conservatives tend to be more structured and persistent in their judgments whereas liberals are more open to new experiences.

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Network neutrality is the principle that Internet users should be in control of what content they view and what applications they use on the Internet. The Internet has operated according to this neutrality principle since its earliest days. It is this neutrality that has allowed the internet to innovate and grow. Without equal access the internet dies.